Painting the Nursery is No Child’s Play

Posted on October 9, 2014

Painting a nursery is one of the most beautiful moments in being new parents. It’s one of the few activities that couples do together to affirm the new chapter in their lives that’s about to begin.

Painting a nursery is one of the most beautiful moments in being new parents. It’s one of the few activities that couples do together to affirm the new chapter in their lives that’s about to begin.

Couples should be aware, however, that what they’re doing is more than just painting a nursery; they’re painting the place where their baby will sleep in for the near future. This is the place where the child will be at their most vulnerable. But, we’re not talking about physical dangers, though; we’re talking about paint dangers.

What most parents don’t know is that the toxins of paint don’t leave the room, even after the foul smell disappears. In fact, there are cases when it takes years for a room to be rid of all the toxins released when its walls were first given a fresh coat. Painting the nursery haphazardly will be like condemning the baby to inhale paint fumes for the rest of its stay in the room.

It’s the parent’s responsibility to keep everything safe for their child, especially when they can’t even stand by themselves yet.

Volatile Compounds

When planning to paint a nursery, be sure to get paint that’s completely free of volatile organic compounds (VOC). These are the things that make paint toxic for people, not just babies. Of course, the whole VOC problem was much worse when lead was still the toast of the painting world, but people should take even more measures to reduce these levels to as near zero as possible.

To determine whether a paint brand has any amount of VOCs in its mixture, future parents might need to consult with a painting expert. Professionals can quickly determine whether a brand has any dangerous compounds in its mixture, based on the reputation of the company and the chemicals used.

Keep your baby safe, and contact us here at Barker-Whittle for any paint enquiries you might have.

Posted in Painting Tips